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The communities that were uprooted in summer 5765 (2005)
Settlement in northern Samaria was renewed in the late 70's.  The Sa-Nur settlement served as a transit and integration point for the settler groups before they formed their own communities.  The first settler group was the Dotan Group which settled in Sa-Nur in 1977 and founded the Mavoh Dotan village in 1981, followed by additional villages.     

Homesh – the community is named after the five villages that existed in the area during the Mishnah and Talmud era, preserving its Greek name Pentacomia (Penta = five in Greek.)  In 1978, Homesh was founded as a Nahal group named "Ma'ale Nahal" on a high mountain overlooking the vast plains "from Gedera to Hadera" (650 meters above sea level.)  In 1981, the settlement received official recognition and became a secular community in the Samaria Regional Council of the National Laborer Settlement Movement.  In the 1990's, the founding group was joined by a large group of Russian immigrant families, and in the early 2000's, a number of religious young couples moved there and became part of the unique social fabric that developed in the community, and even founded a Yeshiva. 

Kadim – Jenin adjacent, this community has a symbolic name that is reminiscent of the nearby Beit Kad village.  Kadim was founded as a Nahal settlement 3 km southeast of the City of Jenin.  In 1984, the settlement received official recognition and became a secular community in the Samaria Regional Council of the National Laborer Settlement Movement.  The Kadim community was set in the heart of a pine forest overlooking the Dotan Valley and the northern valleys, and was known for its beauty and a buzzing community life.
Ganim – Jenin adjacent, this community preserved its biblical name of Ein Ganim, the City of the Levites. The place was founded as a Nahal settlement and received official recognition a few months after its inception in 1983.  Ganim is located 5 km southeast of the City of Jenin.  The settlement became a secular community in the Samaria Regional Council of the National Laborer Settlement Movement.  Ganim overlooks the magnificent view of the Dotan Valley.
Sa-Nur – Sa-Nur sits on a hill southwest of the Sanur Valley, whose name was given to it by songwriter and composer Neomi Schemer.  Sa-Nur houses an old British police station that once served as a transit and integration point for the settler groups before they formed their own communities, but in the 1990's, was populated by famous Russian artists who turned the old station into an artist village.  The lower level was used for craft workshops and the upper level became a gallery, turning it into a tourist attraction.  
In 2001, after having been almost entirely deserted during the Intifada, Sa-Nur underwent another metamorphosis, and became a vibrant community of a young religious population.

Many challenges stood before the pioneering settlers.  Small isolated settlements with terror attacks on the roads.  Despite the hardship and migration of some of the settlers, the residents clang to their land and cultivated the northern Samaria region.
In the month of Av 5765, as part of the disengagement plan, four of the northern Samaria settlements were destroyed.  The settlers were uprooted from their homes and their homes were destroyed together with 21 settlements in the Gaza region.
After the disengagement, the residents of those four settlements settled in Yad Hana, Gan Ner, Afula, Shavey Shomron and a few other towns.
The Jewish settlement in the western area of northern Samaria continues to thrive in Mavoh Dotan, Hermesh, Shaked, Hinanit, Tal Menashe and Reihan.
The Dotan Valley and the northern Samaria expanse await the return of the sons to their patrimony.   


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